When did the Mississippian civilization live at the Etowah Indian Mounds?

Home to several thousand Native Americans from 1000 A.D. to 1550 A.D., this 54-acre site protects six earthen mounds, a plaza, village site, borrow pits and defensive ditch. Etowah Mounds is the most intact Mississippian Culture site in the Southeast.

When did the Etowah society exist?

“Italwah” or Itaba pronounced today as “Etowah” is a Muskogee – Creek word meaning “town or trail crossing.” The chronology of this settlement covers three phases beginning in the Early Mississippian period of about AD 1000 to the final Mississippian phase of AD 1550.

In what region did the mound building culture live in?

Fort Ancient culture

Fort Ancient is the name for a Native American culture that flourished from 1000 to 1650 CE among a people who predominantly inhabited land along the Ohio River in areas of modern-day southern Ohio, northern Kentucky, and western West Virginia.

Did the Mississippians build mounds?

The Mississippian period (1000 to 1700 A.D.) saw a resurgence of mound building across much of the southeastern United States. Most Mississippian mounds are rectangular, flat-topped earthen platforms upon which temples or residences of chiefs were erected.

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What type of houses did the Mississippians live in?

A typical Mississippian house was rectangular, about 12 feet long and 10 feet wide. The walls of a house were built by placing wooden poles upright in a trench in the ground. The poles were then covered with a woven cane matting. The cane matting was then covered with plaster made from mud.

What is inside an Indian mound?

Mounds could be built out of topsoil, packed clay, detritus from the cleaning of plazas, sea shells, freshwater mussel shells or fieldstones. All of the largest mounds were built out of packed clay. All of the mounds were built with individual human labor.

What did the Etowah Indians eat?

Archaeologists call these “mud & daub” structures. They were permanent, single family dwellings. Here you would have seen men and women going about their daily routine and heard children playing and smelled dinner cooking – corn, squash, beans, and roasting meats or fresh fish or mussels from the Etowah River.

What was the location of the largest mound building culture?

LaDonna Brown, Tribal Anthropologist for the Chickasaw Nation Department of History & Culture, describes Cahokia Mounds, which is located on the site of a pre-Columbian Native American city directly across the Mississippi River from present-day St. Louis.

What Indian tribes were Mound Builders?

From c. 500 B.C. to c. 1650 A.D., the Adena, Hopewell, and Fort Ancient Native American cultures built mounds and enclosures in the Ohio River Valley for burial, religious, and, occasionally, defensive purposes.

Where can we found the mounds?

Mounds and related earthworks are the only significant monumental construction in pre-Columbian Eastern and Central North America. Mounds are given different names depending on which culture they strive from. They can be located all across the world in spots such as Asia, Europe and the Americas.

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How did the Mound Builders die?

Another possibility is that the Mound Builders died from a highly infectious disease. Numerous skeletons show that most Mound Builders died before the age of 50, with the most deaths occurring in their 30s.

Why did the Mississippians disappear?

After reaching its population height in about 1100, the population shrinks and then vanishes by 1350. Perhaps they had exhausted the land’s resources, as some scholars theorise, or were the victims of political and social unrest, climate change, or extended droughts.

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